Post-Katrina Explorations: Another NO East Subdivision
After exploring the first subdivision in New Orleans East, we had to go back and check out another one the very next day.


This house was wide open and hadn't been gutted yet.  Here we go...

Here's a view of part of the yard looking toward part of an apartment complex we checked out just after this area.

Again we are reminded that Katrina cannot held back by fences. 

And while nothing may be able to stop mail carriers, Katrina can certainly flummox them when they find there isn't a box to deliver into.


Inside the house Katrina tried to rearrange the furniture.  Finding that she had no talent for it, she knocked the door off its hinges, threw things on the floor, and headed off to the front room...

...where she knocked over a bookshelf just to prove once and for all that water is the mortal enemy of particle board furniture.

Then she went to the kitchen and left a real stink in the fridge.

Next, Katrina knocked over some cheaply-made wooden chairs into the water, causing them to swell and eventually split, before she smashed out the back patio sliding glass door (not pictured) and stormed off (pun!) to wreck havoc on the rest of the neighborhood.

My guess is the water dissolved the box springs and just left the mattress.

See?  You gotta hang the pictures above the water line.

You know, the mold actually looks kind of nice in here.  It's almost like it was stenciled in.


Further evidence of the inherent incompatibility of standing water and particle board furniture.  Or any other kind of furniture.

Upstairs was pretty much cleared out.  Apparently the owners came back and only took things from upstairs. 

Or maybe they never had any upstairs to begin with.  Maybe they didn't like carrying heavy things up a couple flights?


Again with the trophies.  They must have meant something to someone at the time, didn't they?

Ironically, the plant's last thoughts throughout the flood were a few lines from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

Continue to Part II