Lovecraft Annotated

Whether you're new to Lovecraft or a longtime fan, if you are reading his works, you should read the annotated editions.  This page breaks down the contents of all the annotated volumes that I'm aware of.  All of these are easy to find, especially through online reteailers.


Annotated editions

These are each good starting points for anyone interested in "test-driving" Lovecraft's fiction.  They give a sampling of some of his better works (particularly the first volume below) while introducing biographical details about the author that make him as interesting a subject as his works.  But the annotations can just as easily be ignored by any reader who isn't especially interested.  Also, they're simply large paperbacks, making them very portable, as opposed to some of the more "collectible" volumes that you wouldn't toss in a backpack.

Granted, Lovecraft is neither so ancient an author nor so obscure in his references that he is inaccesible without supplimentary annotations.  However, I found the notes tremendously helpful as well as just plain interesting.  They cover everything from vocabulary (even etymology), relevant history on which some stories were based, and context such as biographical details including from which texts Lovecraft derived certain bits of knowledge and/or inspiration from contemporary events.  If you're looking for an entry point into Lovecraft, I recommend the first volume of either the Dell or Penguin series detailed below, and you can continue from there.



The Dell volumes

The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (1997)
More Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (1999)

These two volumes have been supplanted by the later Penguin series (below) that covers literally all the stories in the Dell series and many, many more.  That said, I think these annotations are a bit better than in the later series.  They tend to be a bit longer, and maybe it's a minor thing to some readers, but I enjoyed the fact that the annotations were included as footnotes on the same page as the story text.  It makes more a much more leisurely read that being forced to flip back and forth up to dozens of times over the course of a story.  Unfortunately, only the two volumes above are footnoted, whereas the three Penguin Classics and the two Revisions and Collaborations volumes push the annotations to the back of the book.  Klinger's book (below) puts them in the margins, which I also liked.  Both the Dell series and Klinger's edition are very good about including many photographs/illustrations as well.  I also liked that the footnotes requoted the text so that it was clear precisely what they were referencing since sometimes it was just a word, other times an entire line.  That was a nice touch.

I consider all four of the works in the first Dell volume to be "essential reading."  In other words, if you're already going to get a copy of these stories (or are looking to experience Lovecraft for the first time; Dunwich was the first HPL story I read), you would be wise to start with this book.  You can peruse the footnotes if you like, but you could just as easily save that for a later reading/second pass through the text if you enjoyed it the first time around.


Contents of The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft
The Rats in the Walls
The Colour Out of Space
The Dunwich Horror
At the Mountains of Madness

The second volume has a good mix of stories.  The only one I'd consider "essential," however, is " The Call of Cthulhu," although "Cool Air" and "The Thing on the Doorstep" are good stories too.  That being said, none of these are bad stories, and many of them are well-known, so anyone who enjoys Lovecraft will want to experience them at least once.  Admittedly, what I consider "essential reading" by Lovecraft is highly subjective.  It's just that my favorites are firmly centered in the Mythos, whereas many of these are stand-alone tales.  On the other hand, they're horror stories rather than the "Dream Cycle" stories which are generally less popular, including (and especially) with me.

Contents of More Annotated H.P. Lovecraft
The Picture in the House
Herbert West—Reanimator
The Hound
The Shunned House
The Horror at Red Hook
Cool Air
The Call of Cthulhu
Pickman’s Model
The Thing on the Doorstep
The Haunter of the Dark

A significant difference between these two volumes is that, while Lovecraft scholar S.T. Joshi wrote all the annotations for the first volume, the "More" collection is credited both to Joshi and Peter Cannon.  I'm not sure how involved Joshi actually was with this volume.  The Introduction and Acknowledgments are both written by Cannon, and said Acknowledgments page lists seven individuals who assisted with the annotations, which I wouldn't have expected given Joshi's encyclopedic knowledge of the source material and its context.  On the other hand, it does say in a couple places that the annotations are by both credited authors.  I am curious about the extent of Joshi's involvement, and assume it was less than Cannon's, that the former was given additional credit because the story texts are from the corrected editions published by Arkham House that Joshi prepared years ago.

One weird thing about these books: No table of contents!  Normally I wouldn't care because I'd just read them straight through, but lately I've been reading various HPL stories to my son, and it's hard to find the story I'm looking without either
consulting this page or flipping through the physical book, especially with the second volume (The first only has four stories, of course).


The Penguin Classics volumes

There is the Penguin Classics series of three collections, again with annotations by Joshi.  In these the annotations are at the back of the book rather than the bottoms of the pages, which is annoying (You may as well read the stories first and the annotations later unless you're willing to flip back and forth sometimes two or three times per page!), but they are also different between these two editions (belonging to different publishers).  That said, the gist of most of the notes is almost always the same.  There is also a longer introduction to the story at the beginning of the notes.

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (1999)
The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories (2001)
The Dreams in the Witch House and Other Weird Stories (2004)

The first volume is an especially good selection, and between it and the first volume of the Dell series above, I think you'd have most of the really essential Lovecraft stories.  The second volume collects about 90% of what I think was missing, and the third and final volume is rich with Dream Lands stories, but it also has The Dreams in the Witch House
and The Shadow Out of Time which are both very good, especially the latter.


Contents of The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories
Dagon
The Statement of Randolph Carter

Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family
Celephaïs
Nyarlathotep
The Picture in the House
The Outsider

Herbert West–Reanimator
The Hound
The Rats in the Walls
The Festival

He
Cool Air
The Call of Cthulhu
The Colour Out of Space
The Whisperer in Darkness

The Shadow Over Innsmouth
The Haunter of the Dark


Contents of The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories
The Tomb
Beyond the Wall of Sleep
The White Ship
The Temple
The Quest of Iranon
The Music of Erich Zann
Under the Pyramids ["Imprisoned with the Pharaohs", as Harry Houdini]
Pickman's Model
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
  The Dunwich Horror
At the Mountains of Madness
The Thing on the Doorstep

Contents of The Dreams in the Witch House and Other Weird Stories
Polaris
The Doom That Came to Sarnath
The Terrible Old Man
The Tree
The Cats of Ulthar
From Beyond
The Nameless City
The Moon-Bog
The Other Gods
Hypnos
The Lurking Fear
The Unnamable
The Shunned House
The Horror at Red-Hook
In the Vault
The Strange High House in the Mist
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath
The Silver Key
Through the Gates of the Silver Key
The Dreams in the Witch House
The Shadow Out of Time

Beware when tracking these down, especially online.  In the UK there is a similarly-titled series (also by Penguin) called the Penguin Mini Modern Classics, all of which have contents different than listed above.  There is also a deluxe edition of The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (not sure what's "deluxe" about it though) and a hardcover edition of The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories that also includes an essay ("Haunted Castles, Dark Mirrors: On the Penguin Horror Series") by Guillermo del Toro.  I believe the latter is annotated, but I'm not sure about the former.  Point is, there are volumes with similar names, so beware if you're buying online.  Even the covers of the editions I own have varied a bit.  Note the difference between the third volume and the other two.  All three of mine are formatted more like the third one.

To be continued?

It's doubtful there will be another/final volume at this point, which is unfortunate for obsessive completists like myself.  What remains unannotated certainly doesn't rank in any way as "essential" works, but that's perhaps what would make the annotations themselves more interesting.  I recall an interview in which Joshi commented that he was largely finished with Lovecraft professionally, but that he had hoped to eventually publish annotated versions of what hadn't been included in these volumes.  Those would presumably include the junvenalia and the very short fiction Lovecraft produced between better-known works.



The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft

The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft - Leslie S. Klinger (2014)

Update: This volume was published after I created this page.  Big thanks to Leiann for getting it for me for Xmas since I probably wouldn't have gotten around to getting it for myself anytime soon otherwise (I had just gotten another volume from the Penguin series plus the two "Revisions and Collaborations" volumes at the bottom of this page, and Pete Rawlik's amazingly fun Reanimators as well!).  From what I understand, as I haven't read much other than the lengthy introduction and all the appendices as of this writing, there is very little overlap in the contents of the annotations in Klinger's book with those above.  In addition to the fact that it is by a new annotator, the focus is less on biographical details than on Lovecraftian scholarship.  Additionally, there are many photos and illustrations, including some Weird Tales covers.

There are also the aforementioned appendices (detailed below) that are more fun than academic (Note that I read all of these first!).  Best of all, the annotations are on the same page as the text (this time in the margins rather than as footnotes, like in the Dell series).  As I mention above, I consider that the appropriate format for annotated editions.

Contents of The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft
Dagon
The Statement of Randolph Carter
Beyond the Wall of Sleep
Nyarlathotep
The Picture in the House
Herbert West–Reanimator
The Nameless City
The Hound
The Festival
The Unnamable
The Call of Cthulhu
The Silver Key
The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
The Colour Out of Space
The Dunwich Horror
The Whisperer in Darkness
At the Mountains of Madness
The Shadow Over Innsmouth
The Dreams in the Witch House
The Thing on the Doorstep
The Shadow Out of Time
The Haunter of the Dark

Additional Material
Most of these are just a few pages (or even just a page), but they're interesting, and I thought I'd go into a little detail about what each contains.

Appendix 1: Chronological Table - Creates a timeline of events specifically dated within the stories (e.g., the birth/death of characters, events in the history of various towns, etc.)  This is tremendously helpful in writing Lovecraftian fiction set directly in the Mythos.  I can imagine writing a novel like Rawlik's Reanimators that features many of Lovecraft's characters would have been made much easier with something like this concordance of events across all works to resolve issues such as getting characters' respective ages right for the year in which the story was set.

Appendix 2: Faculty of Miskatonic University - A listing of all characters from M.U. along with their area of specialization and the respective story(ies) in which they appeared.

Appendix 3: History of the Necronomicon - Not an appendix so much as a reprint of the outline by HPL, including copies of the handwritten draft of it.

Appendix 4: Geneology of the Elder Races - A "family tree" based on an extract from one of HPL's letters detailing the relationship among these "gods."  Interesting, but not essential.  Note that Derleth and many others played with their own versions.  Admittedly, it's nice to see HPL's version arranged graphically.

Appendix 5: The Works of H.P. Lovecraft - A table of all solo works.  (You can find a version on Wikpedia.)

Appendix 6: The "Revisions" of H.P. Lovecraft - Same as the above, only for all collaborations.

Appendix 7: H.P. Lovecraft in Popular Culture - A brief discussion of adaptations in games, comics, audio adaptations, and movies.  In the latter case, an incomplete list of feature films is included, but I have a lot of problems with it.  First of all, there's no discussion of the films themselves beyond partial credits and which story it attempts to adapt.  Some text beyond a table is important because a film like The Shuttered Room (1967),
for example, is included even though it's based on a story by August Derleth, and the film does not even include the key Lovecraft element in teh story that connected it to the mythos.  Meanwhile, other adaptations that are not explicitly based on Lovecraft (such as The Thing (1982) or Prometheus (2012) or The Banshee Chapter (2013)) but are clearly derived from his stories are not included on this list.  The appendix doesn't attempt to be a guide, but it's not even a very good checklist in its published form.  I realize that it's not really fair to criticize the an appendix for failing to give a comprehensive survey of a totally separate medium outside its scope, but it doesn't do a good job at its stated aim.  A better reference is my guide to HPL's film adaptations.

To be continued?

Will there be a sequel?  I don't know.  However, Klinger has previously done three volumes on the Sherlock Holmes stories, and in the introduction to this volume he lists other Lovecraft stories he would have liked to have included this time around, so... maybe!

Update!: Yes, there will be another collection.  Wilum H. Pugmire has reported on his blog that Volume 2 is in the works.  Stories Klinger expects to include:
The Tomb
Polaris
Transition of Juan Romero
The Doom that Came to Sarnath
Ex Oblivione
The Terrible Old Man
Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family
The Cats of Ulthar
Celephais
The Temple
The Outsider
The Other Gods
The Music of Erich Zann
The Quest of Iranon
The Lurking Fear
The Rats in the Walls
The Shunned House
He
Cool Air
The Strange High House in the Mist
Pickman's Model
The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath

While most of these stories don't especially excite me, this will be the first time a few of them (i.e., Transition of Juan Romero, Doom That Came to Sarnath, and Ex Oblivione) have ever been annotated.  Also, we can hope for more great "additional material" like the first volume supplied.


To take it backwards...

Here's a list of all the stories (listed chronologically) and in which volumes you can find the annotated versions.
  Note that the headings (e.g., Macabre stories) only denote periods in Lovecraft's career rather than rigid groupings.  For example, "Cool Air" falls under the "mythos" heading even though the story is more of a throwback to this "Macabre" period.  Also, it might be "neater" if I left the collaborations (covered at the bottom of this page) out of the list, but I think it's more complete and gives better career context to give a complete list.

Key:
d1 = The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (published by Dell)
d2 = More Annotated H.P. Lovecraft
(published by Dell)
p1 = The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (published by Penguin)
p2 = The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories (published by Penguin)
p3 = The Dreams in the Witch House and Other Weird Stories (published by Penguin)
n1 = The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft (I'm noting these in parentheses because this volume is so different)
n2 = The New Annotated H.P. Lovecraft vol 2 (tentatively)
r1 = The Crawling Chaos and Others: The Annotated Revisions and Collaborations of H.P. Lovecraft, Volume 1
r2 =
Medusa's Coil and Others: The Annotated Revisions and Collaborations of H.P. Lovecraft, Volume 2
none = Not annotated in any of these volumes.  However, if you're aware of other annotated collections, please email me!


Shorthand: d = Dell, p = Penguin, r = revisions, n = "
New Annotated," and the numbers = volume in series (1st, 2nd, etc.)

Juvenalia (No annotated versions of these stories have been released to date, though S.T. Joshi has apparently prepared at least some and has expressed some interest in releasing them in the future.)
1897?: The Noble Eavesdropper (nonextant)
1897: The Little Glass Bottle
1898: The Secret Cave or John Lees Adventure
1898: The Mystery of the Grave-Yard
1898/1902: The Haunted House (nonextant)
1898/1902: The Secret of the Grave (nonextant)
1898/1902: John, the Detective (nonextant)
1902: The Mysterious Ship
1905, April 21: The Beast in the Cave
1907: The Picture (nonextant)
1908: The Alchemist

Macabre stories
1917, June: The Tomb - p2
(and n2?)
1917, July: Dagon - p1 (and n1)
1917: A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson - none
1917: Sweet Ermengarde - none
1918, May?: Polaris - p3
(and n2?)
1918: The Mystery of Murdon Grange (nonextant)
1918/19: The Green Meadow (with Winifred V. Jackson) - r1
1919: Beyond the Wall of Sleep - p2 (and n1)
1919: Memory - none
1919: Old Bugs - none
1919, September 16: The Transition of Juan Romero
- (n2?)
1919, November: The White Ship - p2
1919, December 3: The Doom That Came to Sarnath -
(n2?)
1919, December: The Statement of Randolph Carter - p1 (and n1)

Dream Cycle stories
1920, January 28: The Terrible Old Man - p3
(and n2?)
1920: The Tree - p3
1920, June 15: The Cats of Ulthar - p3
(and n2?)
1920: The Temple - p2 (and n2?)
1920: Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family - p1 (and n2?)
1920?: The Street - none
1920?: Life and Death (lost)
1920: Poetry and the Gods (with Anna Helen Crofts) - r1
1920, early November: Celephaïs -
p1 (and n2?)
1920, November 16: From Beyond - p3
1920, early December: Nyarlathotep -
p1 (and n1)
1920, December 12: The Picture in the House -
p1 and d2 (and n1)
1920/21: The Crawling Chaos (with Winifred V. Jackson) - r1
1920/21: Ex Oblivione -
(n2?)
1921, January: The Nameless City - p3 (and n1)
1921, February 28: The Quest of Iranon - p2
(and n2?)
1921, March: The Moon-Bog - p3
1921: The Outsider -
p1 (and n2?)
1921, August 14: The Other Gods - p3 (and n2?)
1921, December: The Music of Erich Zann - p2 (and n2?)
1921, September to mid-1922: Herbert West—Reanimator - p1 and d2 (and n1)
1922, March: Hypnos - p3
1922, June 5: What the Moon Brings - none
1922, June: Azathoth - none
1922, June: The Horror at Martin’s Beach (with Sonia H. Greene) - r1
1922, September: The Hound -
p1 and d2 (and n1)
1922, November: The Lurking Fear - p3
(and n2?)
1923, August–September: The Rats in the Walls - p1 and d1 (and n2?)
1923, September: The Unnamable - p3 (and n1)
1923: Ashes (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.) - none
1923: The Ghost-Eater (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.) - none
1923: The Loved Dead (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.) - none
1923, October: The Festival -
p1 (and n1)
1924?: Deaf, Dumb, and Blind (with C. M. Eddy, Jr.) - none
1924, February–March: Under the Pyramids (with Harry Houdini) - p2 and r1
1924, October 16–19: The Shunned House - p3 and d2
(and n2?)

Cthulhu Mythos/Lovecraft Mythos stories
1925, August 1–2: The Horror at Red Hook - p3 and d2
1925, August 11: He -
p1 (and n2?)
1925, September 18: In the Vault - p3
1926?: The Descendant - none
1926, March: Cool Air -
p1 and d2 (and n2?)
1926, Summer: The Call of Cthulhu - p1 and d2 (and n1)
1926, July–October: Two Black Bottles (with Wilfred Blanch Talman) - r1
1926: Pickman’s Model - p2 and d2
(and n2?)
1926: The Silver Key - p3 (and n1)
1926, November 9: The Strange High House in the Mist - p3
(and n2?)
1926, Autumn? to 1927, January 22: The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath - p3 (and n2?)
1927, January to March 1: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward - p2 (and n1)
1927, March: The Colour Out of Space -
p1 and d1 (and n1)
1927, November 2: The Very Old Folk - none
1927, November 25: The Thing in the Moonlight - none
1927: The Last Test (with Adolphe de Castro) - r1
1927: History of the Necronomicon - (n, as an appendix)
1928: The Curse of Yig (with Zealia Bishop) - r1
1928?: Ibid - none
1928, Summer: The Dunwich Horror - p2 and d1 (and n1)
1929?: The Electric Executioner (with Adolphe de Castro) - r1
1929, December to early 1930: The Mound (with Zealia Bishop) - r1
1930, May: Medusa’s Coil (with Zealia Bishop) - r2
1930, February 24 to September 26: The Whisperer in Darkness -
p1 (and n1)
1931, February to March 22: At the Mountains of Madness - p2 and d1 (and n1)
1931: Discarded Draft of The Shadow Over Innsmouth - none?
1931, November? to December 3: The Shadow Over Innsmouth -
p1 (and n1)
1931, late: The Trap (with Henry S. Whitehead) - r2
1932, January to February 28: The Dreams in the Witch House - p3 (and n1)
1932: The Man of Stone (with Hazel Heald) - r2
1932, October: The Horror in the Museum (with Hazel Heald) - r2
1932, October to 1933, April: Through the Gates of the Silver Key (with E. Hoffmann Price) - p3
1933: Winged Death (with Hazel Heald) - r2
1933: Out of the Aeons (with Hazel Heald) - r2
1933, August 21–24: The Thing on the Doorstep - p2 and d2 (and n1)
1933, October: The Evil Clergyman - none
1933/35: The Horror in the Burying-Ground (with Hazel Heald) - r2
1933: The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast (with R. H. Barlow) - r2
1933: The Slaying of the Monster (with R. H. Barlow) - r2
1933?, late: The Book - none
1934, May: The Tree on the Hill (with Duane W. Rimel) - r2
1934, June: The Battle that Ended the Century (with R. H. Barlow) - r2
1934, November to 1935, March: The Shadow Out of Time - p3 (and n1)
1935, January: “Till A’ the Seas” (with R.H. Barlow) - r2
1935, June: Collapsing Cosmoses (with R.H. Barlow) - r2
1935, August: The Challenge from Beyond (with C. L. Moore; A. Merritt; Robert E. Howard, and Frank Belknap Long) - r2
1935, September: The Disinterment (with Duane W. Rimel) - r2
1935, October: The Diary of Alonzo Typer (with William Lumley) - r2
1935, November: The Haunter of the Dark -
p1 and d2 (and n1)
1936, January: In the Walls of Eryx (with Kenneth Sterling) - r2
1936, Autumn?: The Night Ocean (with R.H. Barlow)  - r2

Those stories which do not appear any of these collections tend to be the very early and/or very short works.  Since some solo stories are not covered by any of these collections, I recommend the
Barnes & Noble Complete Fiction collection (reviewed on this page) if you want print copies of everything and already have all the annotated volumes.


The Revisions and Collaborations

Lovecraft's collaborations have been collected (completely or usually only partially) in a number of volumes.  I could list some of those here to try to make a complete library, but your best bet is the following two volumes which collect and annotate nearly all the collaborations and revisions, including some that Joshi no longer considers Lovecraft's contributions significant enough to include Lovecraft as a collaborator, which are included as appendices in each.  He doesn't use the term, but he seems to suggest HPL's role to be more merely editorial in some of these cases.  The annotated editions address the issues of who contributed what and/or how much to each story, something I've summarized on this page.

Contents of The Crawling Chaos and Others: The Annotated Revisions and Collaborations of H.P. Lovecraft, Volume 1 - H.P. Lovecraft and S.T. Joshi
The Green Meadow (with Winifred V. Jackson)
Poetry and the Gods (with Anna Helen Crofts)
The Crawling Chaos (with Winifred V. Jackson)
The Horror at Martin’s Beach (with Sonia H. Greene)
Under the Pyramids (with Harry Houdini)*
Two Black Bottles (with Wilfred Blanch Talman)
The Last Test (with Adolphe de Castro)
The Curse of Yig (with Zealia Bishop)
The Electric Executioner (with Adolphe de Castro)
The Mound (with Zealia Bishop)

Appendices:
Four O'Clock by Sonia Greene
A Sacrifice to Science by Adolphe de Castro
The Automatic Executioner by Adolphe de Castro

Contents of Medusa's Coil and Others: The Annotated Revisions and Collaborations of H.P. Lovecraft, Volume 2 -  H.P. Lovecraft and S.T. Joshi
Medusa’s Coil (with Zealia Bishop)
The Trap (with Henry S. Whitehead)
The Man of Stone (with Hazel Heald)
Winged Death (with Hazel Heald)
The Horror in the Museum (with Hazel Heald)
Out of the Aeons (with Hazel Heald)
The Horror in the Burying-Ground (with Hazel Heald)
The Slaying of the Monster (with R. H. Barlow)
The Hoard of the Wizard-Beast (with R. H. Barlow)
The Tree on the Hill (with Duane W. Rimel)
The Battle that Ended the Century (with R. H. Barlow)
“Till A’ the Seas” (with R.H. Barlow)
Collapsing Cosmoses (with R.H. Barlow)
The Challenge from Beyond (with C. L. Moore; A. Merritt; Robert E. Howard, and Frank Belknap Long)
The Disinterment (with Duane W. Rimel)
The Diary of Alonzo Typer (with William Lumley)
In the Walls of Eryx (with Kenneth Sterling)
The Night Ocean (with R.H. Barlow)

Appendices:
Notes to "Medusa’s Coil"
Notes to "The Challenge from Beyond"
The Diary of Alonzo Typer by William Lumley
The Sorcerry of Aphlar (with Duane W. Rimel)


*Under the Pyramids - Though credited to Houdini, this was simply ghostwritten, although it is often credited as "with Harry Houdini," as though authorship was shared.  It's a longer and more nuanced story than this, but basically Houdini provided a premise which he claimed was true (It wasn't), and HPL wrote his own story instead.  See the entry on my page The Contributions within Lovecraft's Collaborations for the full version.  As such, I'm surprised it was included in these volumes.  An annotated version also appears in The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories.

What's missing?

These volumes are both the "Revisions and Collaborations of H.P. Lovecraft," so it sets itself up as incomplete by promising more than are delivered.  However, what is absent are apparently minor contributions.  Here are the ones that spring to mind.

August Derleth's works - There are a number of stories by Derleth on which Lovecraft is co-credited as a posthumous collaborator.  These are often stories written entirely by Derleth based on suggestions or lists of story ideas by Lovecraft.  In other cases Derleth used existing text by Lovecraft (e.g., personal notes on a trip) in the body of his own stories, possibly as a means of justifying using Lovecraft's name as co-author.  Additionally, Derleth wrote his own stories expanding Lovecraft's mythos.  (Indeed, Derleth originated the term "Cthulhu Mythos," although HPL objected to it.)  Regardless of how you view these "posthumous collaborations," it seems strange that these are never included in lists of collaborations while a story like The Mound is regarded as a collaboration when Lovecraft wrote the entirety of the text and the "collaborator" merely wrote a two-sentence suggestion for the premise.  That's the reverse of what Derleth did, sure, but Lovecraft and
Zealia Bishop are always listed as collaborators just the same.

Through the Gates of the Silver Key (with E. Hoffmann Price) - This is usually included with the larger body of HPL's work rather than treated separately as a revision or collaboration.  For example, an annotated edition can be found in the Penguin's The Dreams in the Witch House
and Other Weird Stories.  Apparently Lovecraft wrote the majority of the text, but the story was begun (i.e., original draft written) by Price.

Two other Henry S. Whitehead stories - Three stories are variously credited (at times) as "with H.P. Lovecraft."  The Trap is included in Vol. 2 above.  Others include:
Bothon - I'm aware of a study (haven't read it firsthand though) that seems to indicate that Lovecraft's input to this story (if any) was negligable.
Cassius

The C. M. Eddy, Jr. stories - One unfinished work (see below) and four completed stories which include:
Ashes
The Ghost-Eater
The Loved Dead
Deaf, Dumb, and Blind

According to Wikipedia, Lovecraft's contribution on these stories seems to have ranged from making suggestions and perhaps a paragraph change.  These are still under copyright by Eddy's family, perhaps the only
stories Lovecraft was involved with to have such limitations.  The copyright has almost certainly kept them from inclusion in collections like these, meaning that they are ironically kept out of print because of the protections intended to keep them in print.

Additionally, The Cancer of Superstition, was ghostwritten by the two for Houdini but the project was never completed due to Houdini's death.  Derleth intended to finish it, but he passed away as well before doing so.  However, notes and surviving fragments were published in The Dark Brotherhood and Other Pieces, which collects several other pieces by Lovecraft and others.



   

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